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Keeping your job search a secret while employed


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#1 WreckWench

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 12:06 PM

Keeping your job search a secret while employed
Abridged: Wall Street Journal

NEW YORK, NY -- With 47 percent of current employees searching for new jobs or planning to do so within the next year, according to Yahoo HotJobs, conducting a search in secrecy is important if job seekers don't want to jeopardize their current position or displease their higher-ups. A little discretion -- and the features online job boards offer to allow people to remain anonymous -- can help people avoid sabotaging a current position.

Attire can be a dead giveaway that an employee is interviewing elsewhere. If your company is business casual and you show up at work in a suit on days you are interviewing, it can raise red flags.For interviews that may last longer than an hour, it may be wise to take a vacation or personal day.

Candidates should also be sure to separate their job from their search. Under no circumstances should you use work e-mail or telephones to conduct your job search. Instead create a private e-mail account for a search and use a cell phone or home number on a resume. Aside from increasing your chances of being exposed, using company resources to conduct a search could rub potential hiring managers the wrong way and give the impression that you're someone willing to abuse company time.

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#2 georoc01

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 11:26 AM

Keeping your job search a secret while employed
Abridged: Wall Street Journal

NEW YORK, NY -- With 47 percent of current employees searching for new jobs or planning to do so within the next year, according to Yahoo HotJobs, conducting a search in secrecy is important if job seekers don't want to jeopardize their current position or displease their higher-ups. A little discretion -- and the features online job boards offer to allow people to remain anonymous -- can help people avoid sabotaging a current position.

Attire can be a dead giveaway that an employee is interviewing elsewhere. If your company is business casual and you show up at work in a suit on days you are interviewing, it can raise red flags.For interviews that may last longer than an hour, it may be wise to take a vacation or personal day.

Candidates should also be sure to separate their job from their search. Under no circumstances should you use work e-mail or telephones to conduct your job search. Instead create a private e-mail account for a search and use a cell phone or home number on a resume. Aside from increasing your chances of being exposed, using company resources to conduct a search could rub potential hiring managers the wrong way and give the impression that you're someone willing to abuse company time.



I have a few things on this one..

The dress code definitely comes into play. We had announced layoffs at my previous employer the day before I had an interview, for business school. My employer knew about my school plans and it was part time and being paid by them, but not the interview. When they saw me come in the next day in a suit I was immediately called into my office to ask me about my attire and that things were ok and that I shouldn't panic that I wouldn't have a job in the future.

Secondly, watch out for job fairs. One time I ran into my employer at a job fair. At that point you are busted and have no recourse but to be honest about it. Same with applying to blind ads, you never know if the ad is the one your employer posted.

Finally on the secrecy aspect, at some point you have to let someone know. Your new employer is going to be wanting references on your current job. So think about this ahead of time and plan for who you can tell when the questions from the future employer asks and who you can trust.

#3 Moose

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 11:16 AM

Secondly, watch out for job fairs. One time I ran into my employer at a job fair. At that point you are busted and have no recourse but to be honest about it. Same with applying to blind ads, you never know if the ad is the one your employer posted.



I've never attended a job fair, but here is what you can do to protect yourself if you go to one.

Bring a friend that does NOT work at your same company. If you run into someone from your company say...

"Oh, my friend is here looking for a job and wanted me to come with him for morale support."


In my line of work, I never worry about interviews or job searches. Employers always find ME and come after me!
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Everything I know about knots, I learned from Alexander the Great.

#4 echo3

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 08:40 PM

my supervisor and I went to a job fair together (things were not looking too good at the time)


It's hard to keep your resume active/current when you employer is a big user of Monster and Dice.com!!!
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#5 Brinybay

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 11:20 PM

I've never attended a job fair, but here is what you can do to protect yourself if you go to one.

Bring a friend that does NOT work at your same company. If you run into someone from your company say...

"Oh, my friend is here looking for a job and wanted me to come with him for morale support."


Nah, I wouldn't buy it. For one, you need to go to job fairs dressed the same as you would for an interview, your boss would see right through it. Most boss's are skilled at knowing when you are lying. And it's not a hard skill to learn either, just google "how to tell when someone is lying" and you can find a lot of good resources.
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